U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIORBUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT
 
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News.bytesNews.bytes Extra, issue 336


Advisory Council tours projects benefitting forests and streams of northern California

Members of the BLM's Northwest California Resource Advisory Council got a good look at projects and partnerships benefitting the forests and streams of northern California when they met June 11 and 12 in Weaverville.

Below, council member Rondal Snodgrass, left, raises a question during a discussion with BLM Redding Field Manager Steve Anderson, center of photo, during a tour at the Weaverville Community Forest. The council toured an area where a just-completed timber sale is improving health of the young forest, second photo. (story continues below)
Council member Rondal Snodgrass, left, raises a question during a discussion with BLM Redding Field Manager Steve Anderson, center of photo, during a tour at the Weaverville Community Forest
Tall trees in the community forest benefit from forestry

In the community forest project, long endorsed by the RAC, the Trinity County Resource Conservation District partners with the BLM to manage the nearly 1,000 acres of public forest under terms of Stewardship agreement. With support and input from the community, projects are put in place to improve fire protection for nearby homes, provide open space and recreational trail opportunities and protect the community's scenic beauty. Trees harvested in projects are processed at the sawmill in Weaverville, providing additional economic benefit.

Later in the day, RAC members switched from jeans and boots to shorts and sandals, and boarded rafts to tour the Trinity River between Steel Bridge and Douglas City. The rafters were dwarfed by the towering, timber-covered walls of the Trinity River Canyon, second photo.
Council members in rafts on the Trinity River
The rafters are dwarfed by the towering, timber-covered walls of the Trinity River Canyon

In addition to learning about BLM's management of the Wild and Scenic reach of the river, the council learned about extensive work being done by the Trinity River Restoration Program. The program is legally mandated to restore the Trinity River fishery which has been impacted by historic mining and water diversions. RAC members viewed several projects implemented to improve salmon spawning habitat.

- J. Fontana, 6/08


BLM-California News.bytes, issue 336


 
Last updated: 06-18-2008