Two people stand on a grassy hillside in the King Range Wilderness, overlooking the Pacific Ocean.
BLM
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT
Wildhorses at Sand Creek Barrel Springs Byway at sunset.  Photo by Laurie Sada Upper Wall Canyon creek.  Photo by B. Parrott Windmill at Sunset in Surprise Valley Sunset reflection on Upper Lake in Surprise Valley.
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Surprise Field Office

Petroglyph Logo  Archaeological / Cultural


Brief Cultural History 

Cultural Resources in the Surprise Field Office trace back to 10,000 B.C. The early inhabitants of this area lived in a vastly different landscape than we see today. Large lakes covered most of the desert floors, the edges Ancient drawings carved on a weathered rockwere teeming with plant and animal life. Fish and birds were abundant in and around the lakes and adjacent marshland. Large grasslands stretched for miles on the highlands providing habitat for large herbivores. The areas volcanic nature left obsidian deposits that ancient peoples crafted sharp and effective tools and weapons. Around 3,000 B.C. a long period of drought began, vastly changing the landscape into what it is today. 

Northern Paiute arrived in the Great Basin around 1,500 years ago. The Paiutes were hunter-gatherers and moved with the food sources as the seasons changed. Pioneers arriving on the Applegate Lassen Emigrant Trail in the 1840s and 50s in wagon trains found the Paiutes still living around Surprise Valley.  The Applegate Lassen Emigrant Trail was one of the major trails providing access into California and Oregon. The trail crossed the Black Rock Desert and through the towering walls of High Rock Canyon, across the Hays Range, into Surprise Valley and beyond. Wagon ruts, dates engraved on canyon walls, as well as the remains of homesteads are a testament to these early travelers.



Enjoy But Do Not Destroy Your American Heritage

These traces of the past belong to the future.  Allow future generations to enjoy their American heritage, removing artifacts or remains destroys valuable clues to the past. It is unlawful to take any artifact from Public Land without a permit. 

Report any theft or vandalism to the BLMs Surprise Field Office.


View of juniper trees, a valley lake and distant montians

California National Historic Trail

 

Fluffy clouds over towering rock canyon walls in the high desert

Black Rock Desert High Rock Canyon Immigrant Trails NCA


Surprise Field Office
602 Cressler Street, P.O. Box 460
Cedarville, CA 96104
Phone: (530) 279-6101
Fax: (530) 279-2171
Field Manager:  Allen Bollschweiler
Contact us by E-mail