Sand dunes dominate the landscape in the North Algodones Dunes Wilderness Area.
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California
BLM>California>Redding>Noxious Weeds - Puncturevine
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Puncturevine  Tribulus terrestris    Caltrop Family (Zygophyllaceae)
 
Puncturevine photo courtesy of University of Idaho
 
Description: Annual with prostrate or somewhat ascending, mat forming, trailing stems, each about 1/2 to 5 feet long. Leaves opposite, hairy, and divided into 4 to 8 pair of leaflets. Flowers yellow, with 5 petals. Fruit hard, about 1/2 inch across, separating into five parts when mature, each with 2 to 4 sharp, hard spines, resembling a goat's head. Other common names include goathead, caltrop, and Mexican or Texas sandbur.

Habitat: Native to Mediterranean. Grows in pastures, cultivated fields, waste areas and disturbed sites such as roadways. Toxic to livestock in vegetative condition. It particularly thrives in sandy and sandy loam soils. The hard spiny burs damage wool, and may be injurious to livestock as well as humans' bare feet, dogs' pads, and bike tires.

Distribution: Puncturevine is widespread throughout northeastern California and northwestern Nevada with scattered occurrence.

Flowering Period: April to October.

 

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