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Historic oil pumping plant, image courtesy R.C. Baker MuseumCoalinga-Monterey Pipeline (Historic) 


Did you know that there used to be an active pipeline that transported oil from the City of Coalinga to the City of Monterey?  That is a distance of over 100 miles!

View of the Abandoned Monterey-Coalinga Pipeline, Fort Ord NM, photo E. Zaborsky BLM

 View of the abandoned Coalinga-Monterey pipeline

View of the Coalinga Oil and Transport Company Station #2, image courtesy of R. C. Baker Museum

View of Coalinga Oil and Transport Company Station #2


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 Visitors to the Fort Ord National Monument can see part of this historic feature on Trail 49 off Eucalyptus Road.

View of Trail 49 with pipeline, Fort Ord NM, photo E. Zaborsky BLM

View of Trail 49

Also visit Six Inches from Monterey to Coalinga: The First Oil Pipeline in California and the Great Monterey Oil Fire of 1924 - a great resource for learning more about this historic oil pipeline.

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Want more Fort Ord History?  Visit the Fort Ord History - Fort Ord National Monument web page


The Coalinga-Monterey pipeline was built during the early 20th century but only operated for a few years and then abandoned.  Parts of it still exist but are no longer being used to transport oil from the petroleum-rich Great Central Valley to the picturesque Central Coast.

Map of Coalinga-Monterey Oil Pipeline from California State Mining Bureau, image courtesy 3 Rocks Research

Map of Coalinga-Monterey Oil Pipeline from California State Mining Bureau (1916)

Transportation of oil from the Coalinga Oil Fields in Fresno County to the port and City of Monterey began October 24, 1904.  The independent "Coalinga Oil and Transport Company" was purchased in July 1905 by Associated Oil.

The pipeline operated until the Great Fire of Monterey on September 14, 1924.  The cause of the fire was from a 55,000 gallon Associated Oil storage tank on the Monterey Wharf which had been struck by lightning during an intense late summer storm.  The fire threatened the City of Monterey and was not under control until the following day.

View of Abandoned Oil Pipeline near Trail 49 on Fort Ord NM, photo by E. Zaborsky BLM

View of Abandoned Oil Pipeline near Trail 49 on Fort Ord National Monument


Eric Morgan, Monument Manager
Bureau of Land Management
Hollister Field Office
Fort Ord National Monument
20 Hamilton Court
Hollister, CA 95023
Phone: (831) 394-8314
Fax: (831) 394-8346
Contact us by Email

Rick Cooper, Field Manager
Bureau of Land Management
Hollister Field Office
20 Hamilton Court
Hollister, CA 95023
Phone: (831) 630-5000
Fax: (831) 630-5055
Office Hours: 7:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., M-F
Contact us by Email