The Mobius Arch in the Alabama Hills -- This rock arch perfectly frames Mount Whitney in the center opening.
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Noxious Weeds


Halogeton (Halogeton glomeratus (M. Bieb.) C. Meyer)

 
Goosefoot family (Chenopodiaceae) 

Photo of several Halogeton plants

 Close-up Photo of Halogeton plant

GROWTH HABIT:
This Mediterranean annual, erect, many stems. Blue/green in spring, turning yellow or red in fall. Reproduces by seed only.
LEAVES: Alternate, in bunches along the stem, fleshy, tube-like, ending abruptly and tipped with delicate needle-like spine. Tufts of cottony hairs at leaf attachment.
FLOWERS:
Green, inconspicuous, born in leaf axil.
SEEDS:Two types: Black, which germinate during first growing season after produced and brown, which are dormant but viable for several years.
OTHER:
Toxic to livestock, especially sheep, from high oxalate content. Easily dispersed by vehicles and road grading equipment.
KEY CHARACTERS:
  • Fleshy tube-like leaves and tipped with needle-like spine.
  • Reddish stems.
Distribution:
Benton, Montgomery and Westguard Pass. Along roadsides and in mineral material pits – Inyo and Mono Counties