Chapter 12
Special Management Areas

Introduction

The Special Management Area (SMA) label is a locally generated identification designed to flag locations which have specialized management concerns or needs but did not warrant ACEC designation. Generally, the Special Management Areas contain resources or opportunities that warrant a level of management narrowly focused on a localized resource or resource use concern. The guidance provided under the management objective and prescriptions in this chapter are assumed to be sufficient to meeting the resource needs for these areas and further activity level planning is not anticipated. However, further refinement of management prescriptions may be necessary to continue to meet management objectives.

Designation and management prescriptions apply only to public lands and minerals activities on Federally reserved mineral estate. Private lands within or adjacent to SMAC boundaries are not affected by these designations or management prescriptions. Existing permittees and other authorized land uses are recognized as valid and grandfathered rights to the extent applicable under the land use authorization.

In addition to the identification of areas to be designated as SMAs, the SMA outlines management objectives and prescriptions for each SMA. The management objectives and prescriptions provide guidance for the Bureau to implement a resource management regime for the special resources of the area, and in responding to applicants for land use authorizations.

SMA's, with the exception of NCLWMAs, are considered land use authorization avoidance areas. They are known to contain resource values that will pose special constraints for and possible cause for denial of applications for land uses that could not be designed to be compatible with the management objectives and prescriptions for the SMA.

A variety of supporting management activities may be taken to implement the management prescriptions. These generally include: posting boundaries, installing information signs, inventory and monitoring, acquisition of access where appropriate, acquisition of additional lands from willing parties as necessary to meet management objectives,  and resolution of unauthorized uses. Support actions unique to an SMA are listed as part of the SMA description.

Summary

Fourteen SMAs are identified in the RMP containing approximately 21,500 acres. Two existing NCLWMAs are also carried forward from previous plans. The locations of the SMAs are shown on the Resource Area map included in the map packet. The chart at the end of the chapter summarizes the information presented contained in the individual SMA narratives that follow.

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Coast Management Area:

Valley Management Area: