Two people stand on a grassy hillside in the King Range Wilderness, overlooking the Pacific Ocean.
BLM
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT
California Poppies Headwaters Forest Reserve Kayaker enjoying the California Coastal National Monument Headwaters Forest Reserve King Range National Conservation Area
California
BLM>California>Arcata>Noxious Weeds>Noxious Weeds Program
Print Page
Arcata Field Office

Himalayan Blackberry (Rubus discolor )

Rose family (Rosaceae)


 

 Description: This perennial, arched bramble has stems that are sturdy, 0.2-0.6 inches (5-15 millimeters) in diameter and 5-angled, with many prickles, wide-based and generally curved. Leaves are divided into 3-5 separate leaflets generally widest above middle, sharply toothed, white below, longest leaf blade ± 1.7-4.7 inches (5-11 centimeters), bracts at base of compound leaf linear. Flower petals are 0.4-0.6 inches (10-15 millimeters) long, obovate (inverted egg-shape), white to pinkish. Berries are blackberry-like, oblong and black.

Habitat: Native to Eurasia, Himilayan blackberry occurs in disturbed moist areas, roadsides, and fencerows below 5249 feet (1600 meters).

Distribution: Occurs throughout California to British Columbia. Favored by rats for food and shelter. Humans use berries for jams and pies, but berries are not as sweet as true blackberries. Brambles are heavily armed, aggressive, and difficult to eradicate. On public lands managed by the Arcata Field Office, there are some brambles on the Samoa Peninsula.

Flowering Period: May through August