U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIORBUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT
California

News.bytesNews.bytes Extra, issue 257

The future of the Alabama Hills

Diverse groups, from Native Americans to movie producers, agree the Alabama Hills is a special and unique place.

With the hills themselves as a backdrop, Inyo County Film Commission director Chris Langley talks to about movie making in the Alabama Hills with BLM's Central California Resource Advisory Council
Above: With the hills themselves as a backdrop, Inyo County Film Commission director Chris Langley talks to about movie making in the Alabama Hills with BLM's Central California Resource Advisory Council

Lone Pine residents, other stakeholders and the BLM will begin work on a community stewardship strategy for the area west of Lone Pine, under a motion approved by Central California Resource Advisory Council at the November 18 meeting. Council members Paul McFarland, Bishop and Mary Gorden, Lemon Cove, will serve as a subcommittee to work with the group on behalf of the council.

“We favor collaboration between Lone Pine and the BLM,” said Bill Vanherweg, council chair.

The move to charter a subcommittee followed a tour of the Alabama Hills to discuss the varied values and uses of the area. Topics presented on the tour included use of the area by Native Americans, film making in the Alabama Hills, recreational use and economic value.

In addition to forming a subcommittee, the council acted on a recreation fee business proposal for the Clear Creek Special Recreation Management Area managed by the Hollister Field Office. The council recommended the BLM state director approve the plan and that it be implemented under the proposed schedule. The council recommended the plan be presented to the Forest Service/BLM Recreation Advisory Council for consideration if it can be done so and still meet the implementation schedule.

BLM California Resource Advisory Councils

BLM California News.bytes, issue 257