U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIORBUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT
California

News.bytes News.bytes Extra, issue 243

Cultural resources protection with grazing

A recent field trip focused on the effect of livestock grazing on cultural resources in the BLM's Alturas Field Office area of jurisdiction. BLM State Archaeologist Ken Wilson joined members of the Pit River Tribe, grazing permit holder Steve Nelson and Alturas Field Office staff on a tour of the Yankee Jim Ranch grazing allotment on July 2. Alturas Field Office Archaeologist Cheryl Foster-Curley has identified the area as eligible listing on the National Register of Historic Places.

In the spirit of cooperation and coordination, staff, tribal members and the rancher met to discuss ways to protect sensitive cultural resources within the grazing allotment, while still providing for livestock grazing.

Tribal Members and Field Manager Tim Burke, right, discussing a cultural site
Tribal Members and Field Manager Tim Burke, right, discussing a cultural site

(Left to right) Range BLM range management specialist Mark Lowrey, grazing permittee Steve Nelson, field office manager Tim Burke, BLM state archaeologist Ken Wilson and Pit River Tribal Council member Irvin Brown discuss grazing at Yankee Jim.
(Left to right) Range BLM range management specialist Mark Lowrey, grazing permittee Steve Nelson, field office manager Tim Burke, BLM state archaeologist Ken Wilson and Pit River Tribal Council member Irvin Brown discuss grazing at Yankee Jim.


BLM California News.bytes, issue 243