U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land ManagementNews.bytes News.bytes EXTRA, issue 204

World's highest-ranking law enforcement camel visits wild horse and burro adoption

Clear skies, cool temps and a slight breeze provided the perfect setting for the Bureau of Land Management’s wild horse and burro adoption this spring in Norco, California. The event attracted many visitors, an unexpected special guest, and of course a host of new and repeat adopters who collectively adopted 17 burros and 71 Mustangs - a total of 88 animals.

ert, the world's highest ranking law-enforcement camel, stops by to see what all the excitement is about.
Above: Bert, the world's highest ranking law-enforcement camel, stops by to see what all the excitement is about.

More than two hundred people came to see and adopt the Mustangs and burros, watch the gentling demonstrations by Phil West, and talk to previous adopters with their animals. Members of the Mavericks drill team and the Cowgirl Way drill team, who only ride Mustangs, also participated at the Norco event sharing their adoption experiences and love for their Mustangs.

An unexpected guest appearance was made by Bert, the world's highest ranking law-enforcement camel, who was accepted as Reserve Deputy Sheriff for the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department in San Dimas, California, USA, on April 5, 2003, and regularly goes on patrol.

Below: mustangs awaiting adoption:

Visitors gather to watch a gentling demonstration by Phil West:
Visitors gather to watch a gentling demonstration by Phil West

Within two hours trainer Phil West has made a new friend with this 4-year old gelding during the gengling demonstration:

Phil with full side view of mustang

BLM wrangler Thad Waltman from BLM's Litchfield Corral facility near Susanville can't pass up the opportunity to meet Bert up-close and personal:
BLM wrangler hand-to-nose with Bert the law-enforcement camel

Below: Mustangs on parade. Members of the Mavericks Drill Team (blue vests) and the Cowgirl Way Drill Team (purple shirts) who only ride Mustangs, talk about their animals and adoption experiences with visitors and potential adopters.
Members of the Mavericks Drill Team (blue vests) and the Cowgirl Way Drill Team (purple shirts) who only ride Mustangs, talk about their animals and adoption experiences with visitors and potential adopters.

Burros wait for their turn at adoption:
Burros wait for their turn at adoption

 

News.bytes, issue 204

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