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BLM > Arizona > What We Do > Fire & Aviation > Districts & Fire Zones
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Districts and Fire Zones

 Firefighter Looking at Fire From a Distance

BLM Arizona has four districts with corresponding fire zones. Each fire zone provides initial attack and extended attack through dispatch offices which are run by an interagency staff of professionals.  When a fire exceeds initial attack capabilities, the dispatch offices place orders for additional fire resources to the appropriate coordination center.  More information on dispatching in the Southwest Area can be found on the Southwest Area Coordination Center web site.

  • BLM AZ Fire ZonesArizona Strip District Fire Zone 
    • Arizona Strip and Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument
  • Colorado River District Fire Zone
    • Kingman, Lake Havasu and Yuma
  • Phoenix District Fire Zone
    • Hassayampa and Lower Sonoran
  • Gila District Fire Zone
    • Safford and Tucson

Reporting a Wildland Fire

When visiting your public lands, you can provide a greatly appreciated service by looking for and reporting wildland fires. The timely reporting of a fire is critical in the successful management of the fire and ensuring public safety. Information you pass on to the dispatcher will assist the wildland fire resources in responding quickly, safely, and anticipate the resources needed.


Fire & Aviation

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 Public and Firefighter Safety Is Our First Priority

When In Doubt Dial 911 To Report A Wildfire

Lowland Fire

Who To Contact

BLM utilizes four fire management zones for public lands within Arizona. Each fire management zone has one interagency dispatch office. Contact the appropriate fire dispatch office when possible. When in doubt call 911.

The "Checklist" below provides the type of information dispatchers need when a fire is reported.

Arizona Strip DistrictASD Tatra

Arizona Strip District Fire Zone [AZ-ASD]
Office:
(435) 688-3200
Dispatch: (435) 865-4600 or
Report a Wildfire: (435) 865-4611
Dispatch Website:
Color Country Interagency Fire Center

More than 2.7 million acres of BLM-administered public lands lie within the area known as the “Arizona Strip,” located in the northern portions of Coconino and Mohave counties, Arizona, north and west of the Colorado River. The Arizona Strip District Fire Management Program is an interagency effort between the BLM and the Dixie National Forest in Utah.

There is a broad spectrum of resource issues involving fire within this region, including: vegetation classification; various management considerations for fighting fires in areas such as wilderness, desert tortoise habitat and grazing areas; access to remote locations; understanding the resources values to be protected; and, the overall management objectives for the environment.
 
The fire season on the Arizona Strip usually runs from May through early October, with the number of fires peaking in June and July.  Lightning is the most common cause of fires, accounting for approximately 81 percent of all fires burning 96 percent of the total acres. Nearly 90 percent of these fires burn less than 10 acres, and less than two percent consumed more than 1,000 acres.

Colorado River DistrictCRD River Fire

Colorado River District Fire Zone [AZ-CRD]
Office: (928) 718-3700 [Kingman]
             (928) 317-3200 [Yuma]
Dispatch: (928) 777-5700 (24 hours)
Dispatch Website:
Prescott Interagency Fire Center

BLM's Colorado River District encompasses the Kingman, Lake Havasu and Yuma Field Offices.
The vegetation in this management unit is dominated by desert shrubs, trees and cacti; and deep upland sites have overstories of mesquite, palo verde, and ironwood, with understories of perennial and annual grasses and forbs.  In the higher elevation of the Hualapai Mountains, pinon and ponderosa pines dominate the landscape, while the Colorado River corridor is comprised of salt cedar, willows, cottonwoods and other riparian vegetation.

Approximately 98 percent of fires in this zone are human caused and generally occur between the months of February and October. Most of these fires occur near main travel corridors and rivers. The 20-year annual average for all fire causes equates to 36 fires per year, burning an average of 3,000 acres per year.

The Colorado River District Fire Management Zone is a full participant in the Central West Arizona Interagency Fire Management Zone. In this cooperative effort, a variety of agencies have joined forces to fight wildland fires. Participants include the BLM, Forest Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Indian Affairs, National Park Service and Arizona State Forestry.


Phoenix DistrictBurnout Operations at Night

Phoenix District Fire Zone [AZ-PHD]
Office:
(623) 580-5500
Dispatch:
(480) 457-1551 (main)

(480) 457-1555 (24 hours)
1-866-746-6516 (Toll-Free)
Dispatch Website:
Phoenix Interagency Fire Center

The Phoenix District Fire Management Zone is administered by the BLM’s Hassayampa and Lower Sonoran Field Offices. The zone’s fire program is responsible for the protection of nearly 2.4 million acres of BLM public lands and an additional 1.1 million acres within the Barry M. Goldwater Air Force Training Range.

There are a variety of fuel types within this region, including the Sonoran Desert ecosystem, grass lands, desert oak/chaparral with intermixed manzanita, desert shrub and ponderosa pine. Fire season usually begins in mid-March and ends in early September, with an annual average of 61 wildfires, burning an average of 9,000 acres of BLM public lands each year.

The Phoenix District Fire Management Zone is a full participant in the Central West Arizona Interagency Fire Management Zone. In this cooperative effort, a variety of agencies have joined forces to fight wildland fires. Participants include the BLM, Forest Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Indian Affairs, National Park Service and Arizona State Forestry.

Gila DistrictGila District Engine

Gila District Fire Zone [AZ-GID]
Office:
(928) 348-4400
Dispatch: (520) 202-2710 (24 hours)
Dispatch Website:
Tucson Interagency Fire Center

Arizona’s Gila District Fire Zone contains approximately 2.4 million acres and covers the Tucson, Safford and San Pedro Offices.

The zone sees an average of 27 fires each year on BLM public lands, with approximately 3,000 acres consumed per year. A typical fire season runs from March through September.  Lightning strikes cause 60 percent of the fires that occur within the zone.

The Gila District Fire Management Zone is a full participant in the Southeast Arizona Interagency Fire Management Zone. In this cooperative effort, a variety of agencies have joined forces to fight wildland fires. Participants include the BLM, Forest Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Indian Affairs, National Park Service and Arizona State Forestry.


Reporting a Wildfire Checklist

When you report a fire to one of our dispatch offices or 911, the dispatcher will ask some questions to gather information about the fire. This information will help determine the appropriate fire management response. The checklist below gives examples of the information the dispatcher may request.
 
Your name and phone number
A phone number where you can be reached if the dispatchers need more information.
Location of the fire
Be as specific as possible. Identify highway milepost markers, landmarks and if the fire is on the north or south side of the road, or in the median. Also how far the fire has moved and what would be the best route to the fire.
What time did you discover the fire?
 
Size of the fire.
 
What is burning?
Grass, brush, timber, slash, building, vehicle, don't know.
Appearance of smoke

Volume (small, medium, large)
Color (white, gray, blue, black, yellow, copper)
Character (thin, heavy, billowy, drifting)
Increasing or decreasing

What is threatened?
Houses, structures, campgrounds, highways
Which direction is the fire spreading?
 
Do you know what started the fire?
Any information you may have as to how the fire was started will assist us in our investigation.