Wabayuma Peak Wilderness Area

Wilderness Management Plan

Location and Description

The 40,000-acre Wabayuma Peak Wilderness is located in Mohave County, 20 miles southeast of Kingman, Arizona.

This wilderness is dominated by the 7,601-foot Wabayuma Peak. A series of massive ridges that extend from the peak in a semicircle to the north, south, and west, plunge nearly 5,000 feet to the desert floor below. This extensive elevation change accommodates a broad spectrum of ecosystems. The lower reaches of the wilderness contain a mixture of Sonoran and Mohave Desert vegetation. Upper elevations are covered with Arizona chaparral vegetation, and ponderosa pine forests can be found on the mountain summits.

The sheer size and scale of the rugged terrain guarantee a variety of challenging and interesting hikes, backpacking trips, horseback rides and nature study, and encourage extended overnight camping. Visitors can travel through desert shrub and ponderosa pine in one day and are afforded the opportunity for exceptional botanical and wildlife sightseeing within a relatively small geographic area.

Access

A high-clearance 4-wheel drive vehicle is strongly recommended for all access routes described.  (See Map) (pdf)

  • Boriana Canyon Access: Proceed west on I-40 from Kingman (the highway is actually bearing south on this stretch) for approximately 23 miles. Take Exit 25, which is the Yucca and Alamo Road exit. Follow the signs for Alamo Road, proceeding south and east from the interchange for 3.2 miles. Turn left onto Boriana Mine Road and drive an additional 9.9 miles. The wilderness boundary will now be on your left.
  • Southeast Boundary Access: Proceed west on I-40 from Kingman (the highway is actually bearing south on this stretch) for approximately 23 miles. Take Exit 25, which is the Yucca and Alamo Road exit. Follow the signs for Alamo Road, proceeding south and east from the interchange for 3.2 miles. Turn left onto Boriana Mine Road and drive an additional 4.5 miles. Turn left onto Suzette Road. The wilderness boundary can now be reached at three different points.
  • Hualapai Ridge Road Access: From Kingman, take the Hualapai Mountain Road south to the Pine Lake community (about 13 miles). Turn right onto the Hualapai Ridge Road, and proceed 18 to 20 miles south. The wilderness boundary will be on your right. At about the 20 mile mark, the Wabayuma Peak trailhead can be seen on your right.

Limitations

No legal access is possible to the north and northwest sides of the wilderness, because access roads cross private property at several points.

Water is generally available at springs indicated on topographic maps. Always purify any water found prior to use.

Summertime temperatures, even at the higher elevations, can be dangerous if you are not prepared. More moderate conditions are present between October and May, although snow can be present during winter months, which can make access to higher elevations difficult or impossible.

Nonfederal Lands

Some lands around and within the wilderness are not federally administered. Please respect the property rights of the owners and do not cross or use these lands without their permission.

Related Maps

  • 7.5-minute Topographic: Wabayuma Peak, Kingman SE, Hualapai Peak, Yucca NE
  • 1:100,000 BLM Surface Management:  Bagdad, Davis Dam, Needles, Valentine
  • Game and Fish Management Unit 16A

For more information contact:


  Kingman Field Office
2755 Mission Boulevard
Kingman, AZ 86401-5308
Phone: (928) 718-3700
Fax: (928) 718-3761
E-mail: KFOWEB_AZ@blm.gov 
Field Manager:  Ruben Sanchez 
Hours:  8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., M-F


"The wilderness and the idea of wilderness is one of the permanent homes of the human spirit."
Joseph Wood Krutch