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BLM > Arizona > What We Do > National Conservation Lands > Wilderness Areas > Baboquivari Peak
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Baboquivari Peak Wilderness Area

Wilderness Management Plan 
(4.5M)

Location and Description

The 2,065-acre Baboquivari Peak Wilderness is located 50 miles southwest of Tucson, Arizona in Pima County.Baboquivari Peak

The wilderness includes a small, but spectacular portion of the east side of the Baboquivari Range. The sharp rise of Baboquivari Peak dominates the wilderness area. Elevations range from 4,500 feet to 7,730 feet. Vegetation varies from saguaro, paloverde and chaparral communities to oak, walnut and pinyon at the higher elevations.

Recreation opportunities such as photography, sightseeing, and day hikes are enhanced by the dramatic and scenic landscapes. Baboquivari Peak is the only major peak in Arizona that requires technical climbing ability to reach its summit.

Access

From Tucson, travel west on Highway 86 to its junction with Highway 286 to Sasabe. Proceed south along Highway 286 about 30 miles to the entrance road to Thomas Canyon. The Nature Conservancy maintains a pedestrian access route to the wilderness from the Humphrey Ranch in Thomas Canyon.

Nonfederal Lands

Some lands around and within the wilderness are not federally administered. Please respect the property rights of the owners and do not cross or use these lands without their permission.

Related Maps

  • 7.5-minute Topographic: Baboquivari Peak
  • 1:100,000 BLM Surface Management: Sells
  • Game and Fish Management Unit 36C

For more information contact:


  Tucson Field Office
3201 E. Universal Way
Tucson, AZ 85756
Phone: (520) 258-7200
Fax: (520) 258-7238
E-mail: TFOWEB_AZ@blm.gov 
Field Manager:  Vi Hillman
Hours: 8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m., M-F


"In God's wildness lies the hope of the world; the great fresh, unblighted, unredeemed wilderness."
John Muir, 1911