Iditarod National Historic Trail


America’s Last Great Gold Rush Trail

Iditarod exhibit at 2013 Alaska State FairJoin us at the 2014 Alaska State Fair!

This fall BLM will again partner with the Iditarod Historic Trail Alliance, the Alaska Department of Natural Resources, and the Chugach National Forest to host the Iditarod National Historic Trail exhibit at the Alaska State Fair in Palmer (Aug. 21 through Labor Day).

Freight sled on display at Iditarod Fair exhibitHoused in a large white wall tent reminiscent of Iditarod roadhouses of yesterday, the exhibit will feature trail maps, historic photos, and mushing sleds.

The exhibit will be located just inside the Red Gate at the Fair. Look for the "Iditarod Roadhouse" sign and pick up a free zipper pull featuring the official Iditarod National Historic Trail logo!


The Iditarod National Historic Trail commemorates a 2,300-mile system of winter trails that first connected ancient Alaska Native villages, opened up Alaska for the last great American gold rush, and now plays a vital role for travel and recreation in modern day Alaska.

Over 1,500 miles of the historic winter trail system are open today for public use across state and federal lands. The Bureau of Land Management, under the National Trails Act, is the designated Trail Administrator, and works to coordinate efforts by federal and state agencies on behalf of the entire Trail. BLM maintains about 150 miles of the Trail, including four public shelter cabins. The remainder is managed primarily by the State of Alaska, or crosses private Native lands on public easements.

Use the links at right to explore America's Last Great Gold Rush Trail!

 

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 Click here to download Iditarod National Historic Trail Visitor Guide 2008.

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Visitor Guide